Community Organizer- Greenpoint and Williamsburg

 

While the Female Democratic District Leader has limited power, she represents

the neighborhood's concerns to elected officials at the local, state and federal level.

Therefore it's important to know that your District Leader understands the core concerns

of the neighborhood and is willing and ready to speak out in our community's interest. 

 

Hold Developers Accountable

Hold developers accountable for affordable housing, public open space, infrastructure improvement and environmental remediation.

A:

The 50th district has and will continue to experience massive residential real estate construction since 2005. These new residences may help to solve our housing crisis in New York City, but recent history has demonstrated deep inequality. Many developers have received tax breaks and other incentives to develop in our neighborhood, and have left the promises of decent and inclusive affordable housing and open space unfulfilled. Less than 10% of the affordable housing promised to our community has been delivered. Currently, residents have less than 26 square feet per person, which is one of the lowest open space ratios per capita in all of New York City. Most of these new development sites are toxic from historic pollution and hazardous to human health, which has not been adequately remediated. Finally, we are suffering from crumbling roads, overwhelmed subway and buses, and dangerous intersections and truck routes.  We need to be able to trust that those profiting off of our community's growth also contribute to our neighborhood's well-being.  

Raise wages and end income inequality

Raise wages and end income inequality

A:

Kings County (Brooklyn) experiences some of the worst income inequality in the country,and New York City as a whole ranks second worst as a metro area regarding the gap between rich and poor.  Predatory real estate practices play a large role in this.  As rent-stabilized and affordable middle income homes are cleared or converted to luxury buildings, we lose space for growing middle income families who in turn end up leaving the city.  Another contributing factor is the loss of working-class industrial jobs.  Waterfront employment used to be open to all education backgrounds, with union wages and space to grow and be promoted in the company.  Now, as industrial spaces are converted to entertainment, restaurant and hotel businesses, workers often make minimum wage with very little opportunity to grow or move up the ladder. 

There are multiple strategies our community could take to improve this situation.  Zoning refinements, stabilized housing retention, and supporting an increase in the minimum wage could all play a role in a more stable wealth distribution, Emily intends to fight for working families who want to stay in their community. 

Fight corruption at all levels of government

Fight corruption at all levels of government and improve voting 

A:

As many voters have recently learned, our governmental structure is more complicated than we may at first realize.  For a new or uninformed voter, even simple essentials of our system can seem obscure. Slight misunderstandings can lead to disenfranchisement.  Where and when to vote, and what it means to register with a particular party confuse many who attempt to participate in the system-- and it gets more confusing from there.   Many voters are unaware as to who makes what decision-- is it a state issue, a local issue or a federal one? These systems are entangled and not understanding the breakdown often means the loss of a community's voice.  Once we get into the system, processes that our elected officials undergo are often mired in corruption.  Because the public often does not understand how the system works, these corrupt practices can become calcified and entrenched.  Emily, as an educator, will fight to make the government more transparent, and work to create processes that will ensure decisions are being made in with the people's interest in mind rather than the personal interests of representatives.

Demand Pay Equity and Defend Reproductive Rights

Demand Pay Equity and Defend Reproductive Rights

A:

Systemic inequality and reproductive rights are issues that disproportionately disadvantage women, especially single working women, and their children.  These are both issues that city and state lawmakers could help to alleviate.  Through creating governmental oversight on pay equity and minimum wages that are living wages, we will bring more families out of poverty and create more opportunities for all through access to education and healthy living. Through protecting women and children's healthcare benefits across all income levels, we will ensure families are receiving health guidance, preventative care and treatment, giving them the ability to be autonomous members of our community.   By protecting reproductive rights, we ensure families will be more emotionally, physically and financially ready to create their families. 

Expand parks, mass transit and affordable housing

Expand parks, mass transit and affordable housing

A:

Demand for housing in our neighborhood is growing, and with it, our infrastructure is getting crunched.  The mass transit and open space that our communities rely on were created in a different era and for a smaller community.  As we build new housing, we must also consider the impact that these additional residents will have on the neighborhood's functionality.  City parks are at an over capacity and overcrowded, and the open space promised to us has yet to be delivered.  Similarly, our communities rely on trains that are in need of serious repair, have many locked entryways and access points that are blocked, and are not very accessible to people with differing abilities.    

Finally, increase in housing demand means rental and sale prices skyrocketing.  While this does benefit some longtime community members, for many more it signals displacement and a loss of community, memory and history.  We need more units that are truly affordable to working and middle class people and reasonable incentives that don't sell out communities.  We also need to protect the housing stock that is already affordable through protecting and expanding rent stabilization. 


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